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Wind Energy Forum

A Wind Energy Forum

Conducted by the NH House Science, Technology, and Energy Committee  April 30th.

Our Goal: To become better informed by current research and experience on what an effective, efficient, and well balanced approval process should included by addressing:

● What costs and benefits need to be included in the review process.
● What are the difficulties in acquiring accurate data to assess costs and benefits.
● Are there existing evaluation guidelines that have proven useful in accessing specific impact areas. What are their strengths and
weaknesses.
● From concept to production, how well is the existing approval process serving the needs of New Hampshire.
9:30 Matt Magnusson
Economic Impact of the Proposed Antrim 30 MW Wind Power Project in Antrim, New Hampshire Matt Magnusson is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) Whittemore School of Business and Economics with a master of business administration. He
currently is earning his PhD in natural resources and environmental studies at UNH and is also an adjunct lecturer at UNH, teaching sustainability business models.  He has provided analysis on the economic impacts of several different environmental public policy initiatives, including work on the NH Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI),
a carbon cap-and-trade program in the Northeast.

Other research includes “New Hampshire’s Green Economy and Industries: Current Employment and Future Opportunities,” “Economic Impact of the Proposed Antrim 30 MW Wind Power Project in Antrim, New Hampshire,” and the economic analysis
of policies proposed in “The New Hampshire Climate Action Plan,” performed for the NH Climate Change Task Force.
10:00
Factors, Guidelines, and Processes for Reviewing the Impact of Wind Farms on Wildlife
Glenn Normandeau
Executive Director New Hampshire Fish and Game Normandeau is serving his second four-year term as Executive Director. Before becoming Fish and Game’s Executive Director, Normandeau had served for more than five years as the Fish and Game Commissioner
representing New Hampshire’s seacoast region. He is an avid angler and hunter. He is also an experienced businessman, with 19 years previous experience as president and owner of Pickering Marine Corporation, a specialist in marine contracting. He also served 5 years as the marine industry representative on the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Wetlands Council.
N.H. Fish and Game works in partnership with the public to conserve, manage and protect the state’s fish, wildlife and marine resources and their habitats; inform and educate the public about these resources; and provide the public with opportunities
to use and appreciate them.
Carol Foss, Ph.D.  NH Audubon Director of Conservation
Carol holds a B.A. in Biology from Colby College, a M.S. in Zoology from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology
from the University of Maine. Carol has served NH Audubon in a variety of capacities for more than 30 years, beginning her career
as resident naturalist at the Paradise Point Nature Center during the summers of 1975 and 1976. She joined the headquarters staff
as part­time Education Director in 1977, and soon shifted to Director of Wildlife Programs when NH Audubon partnered with
the NH Fish & Game Department to develop the NH Endangered Species Program. After a serving as a consulting biologist while
working towards her Ph.D. and addressing family eldercare needs, Carol returned to full­time duty as Director of Conservation
in September 2007.

Carol is a New Hampshire native, and lives with her husband in the  Penacook neighborhood where her ancestors settled in the 1700s. She is especially interested in bird behavior during the breeding cycle and in the influence of human activities on how birds
use the landscape.  Her favorite places to do field work are the Androscoggin/Magalloway
watershed in northern New Hampshire and western Maine, and the Rio Tahuayo area in
northeastern Peru.
11:00
Fort Felker
Director, National Wind Technology Center
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
B.S., Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Prior to becoming director of the NWTC in 2009, Fort Felker was
the co-founder and vice president of Winglet Technology LLC, a
company that commercialized his patented design of “elliptical
winglets” for business aircraft. Elliptical winglets reduce drag
and fuel consumption, improving the range and takeoff
performance of aircraft. Before his six year stint as an
entrepreneur, Felker was an engineering analyst at Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory, where he developed the
underlying theory and computational modeling for the hypersonic
flow about re-entry vehicles undergoing extreme maneuvers.
From 1994-1996, Felker worked in senior engineering positions
at Kenetech Windpower. As manager of engineering modeling,
he was responsible for developing wind turbine engineering
analysis tools. Later as director of engineering analysis and test,
he played a key role in the development of the KVS-45 wind turbine, and led a team of
engineers and technicians in the testing of large wind turbine systems. His early experience
includes nine years with NASA Ames Research Center and six years with the U.S. Army
Research and Technology Labs, working on rotorcraft analysis and testing.
Felker holds one patent and is the author of 29 publications.
12:00
Lunch Break – Session Overflow Time
1:00
A Visual Impact Assessment Process for Wind Energy Projects
Jean Vissering
Jean Vissering Landscape Architecture – Montpeiler
Vermont
A Few of Her Recent Publications
Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects,
National Research Council of the National Academies
Sabin’s Pasture: A Vision for Development and
Conservation, Central Vermont Community Land Trust
Siting a Wind Turbine on Your Property: Putting Two Good Things Together, Small
Wind Technology & Vermont’s Scenic Landscape, Public Service Board
Wind Energy and Vermont’s Scenic Landscape: A Discussion Based on the
Woodbury Stakeholder Workshops, Vermont Public Service Department
Scenic Resource Evaluation Process, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources
Guidelines to be used by the Agency of Natural Resources in reviewing visual
impacts of development projects under Act 250 in areas of regional and statewide
scenic significance.
1:45
Wind Turbine Health Impact Study: Report of Independent Expert Panel
Sheryl Grace, Ph.D.
Boston University Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
Research Interests: Aerodynamics, Fluid dynamics, and
Acoustics
Professor Grace’s interests lie in the fields of unsteady
aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. She focuses on
creating analytical and computational models of the
mechanics which create sound and vibration. She is most
interested in applications in which the vibration and sound
result from the interactions of unsteady flows past solid
bodies, such as for aircraft external structures and marine
and aircraft propulsion systems. Her analyses are
intended to be used as predictive tools in the design of
next generation systems, and they offer a less expensive mode of prediction as
compared to experiment.
Three examples of physical applications her research group has considered in the
past are the noise generated by high-lift wing systems, the effect of vane clocking
in turbines, and the vibration and sound generated when flow passes over wall
apertures and cavities. The first is of great interest to commercial airline design, the
second impacts blade fatigue in aircraft engines, and the third has a wide variety of
applications ranging from the design of high speed trains to new configurations for
better cooling in computer chips.
Wendy Heiger-Bernays Ph.D.
Boston University – Associate Professor Environmental Health
Ph.D. University of Nebraska
Wendy Heiger-Bernays’ work reflects her education in molecular
toxicology and her professional experience in regulatory
toxicology and risk assessment. Her interests center on
understanding how environmental toxicants adversely affect
people’s health and how risks associated with these exposures
can be quantified. She is collaborating with researchers at
Wellesley College and UMASS Amherst to understand patterns of
migration of contaminants in compost in community gardens and
risks associated with these agents, with the objective of
translating this research into cost-effective best-practices. As a
member of a multi-disciplinary team she is investigating the
properties that impact human health and that limit the
installation of on-shore large wind-turbines. Dr. Heiger-Bernays
is a member of the BUSPH team investigating flame retardants in
which she is focusing on understanding the risks associated with
exposure to the chemicals. In the classroom, Dr. Heiger-Bernays combines the scientific
perspective with a practical emphasis. Her teaching focuses on providing graduate students
the core concepts required of environmental health professionals. She serves on technical
advisory committees for toxicological issues at both the Massachusetts Department of
Environmental Protection and the US Environmental Protection Agency and as chair of her
local board of health.
2:30
ISO New England’s Perspectives on the Impact of Wind Energy for the Grid
Mike Giaimo
External/Legislative Affairs for ISO New England
4:00
Observations on Wind Energy Approval Process in New Hampshire:
A Panel of Attorneys that Have Participated in the Process
Doug Patch
Doug spends much of his time on energy matters,
primarily in regulatory, administrative and legislative
venues. He also works on telecommunications issues and
serves as an arbitrator and mediator as part of his
alternative dispute resolution practice.
In addition to the ten years he has in private practice
representing a variety of clients, he brings twenty-three
years of public service experience to his practice, including
a nine and one-half year term as Chairman of the New
Hampshire Public Utilities Commission, three and one-half
years as an assistant attorney general, and six years as Assistant Commissioner
for the Department of Safety. As counsel for clients before administrative agencies,
Doug has helped obtain regulatory approvals for electric generation facilities,
including wind farms and other generating facilities. He has also represented clients
seeking approval for mergers, acquisitions and transfers of ownership, and has
conducted due diligence reviews for potential purchasers. He has represented
utilities and has intervened in utility proceedings for various companies,
organizations and ratepayer groups. Through his alternative dispute resolution
practice he has mediated and arbitrated issues related to the electric,
telecommunications and water industries, as well as environmental matters. He
has an active practice representing clients before the New Hampshire Legislature.
Amy Ignatius
Chairman New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission
University of Wisconsin (BA, American History, 1977)
University of Virginia (JD, 1982).
Prior experience:
NH Department of Justice, General Counsel, NH PUC
Executive Director, New England Conference of Public
Utilities Commissioners, Inc.
Director, NH Office of Energy and Planning
Commissioner, NH PUC
Vice Chairman, NH Site Evaluation Committee
Member, NH Nuclear Decommissioning Finance Committee
NARUC Committee on Telecommunications
Interstate TRS Fund Advisory Council
Amy Manzelli
Ms. Manzelli is a member and part owner of BCM
Environmental & Land Law, PLLC in Concord, NH. She
practices environmental, conservation, and land law
across New Hampshire.
Ms. Manzelli:

Guides green developers through projects, especially permitting of innovative
and low-impact techniques;

Assists those who oppose or wish to obtain modifications to projects of
others;

Represents clients regularly before all Courts in NH;

Advocates for clients at the State House, with officials of Executive Agencies,
and in Local Land Use Boards; and

Encourages passage, modification or defeat of relevant proposed laws.
Clients benefit from Ms. Manzelli’s commitment to the environment combined with
her extensive legal experience. SuperLawyers continues to rate her as a Rising Star
in Environmental Law. She is also:

On the Board of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New
Hampshire;

Representing the environment on the Residential Ratepayers Advisory Board
as an appointee of the New Hampshire Senate President; and

Serving as an appointee of Governor Lynch on the Water Sustainability
Commission.
Previously, Ms. Manzelli served for over two years on the legislative (HB1295)
Stormwater Commission, representing the New Hampshire Business and Industry
Association, which honored her with an Above and Beyond Award for her service.
Ms. Manzelli earned her Master’s in Environmental Law and her Juris Doctor degrees
from Vermont Law School; and her B.S. in Environmental Conservation and her
B.A. in Spanish from the University of New Hampshire, where she is now a
Distinguished Alumna.
Ms. Manzelli makes her home in Pembroke, NH, along with her husband, toddler,
and two rescued boxer dogs. She enjoys family time, local food, gardening, edible
landscapes, hiking, biking, cooking, and travel.
Peter Roth
Senior Assistant Attorney
Department of Justice Office of the Attorney General

 

 

 

A Forum on Wind Energy
Conducted by the NH House Science, Technology, and Energy Committee
Our Goal: To become better informed by current research and experience
on what an effective, efficient, and well balanced approval process should
included by addressing:
● What costs and benefits need to be included in the review process.
● What are the difficulties in acquiring accurate data to assess costs
and benefits.
● Are there existing evaluation guidelines that have proven useful in
accessing specific impact areas. What are their strengths and
weaknesses.
● From concept to production, how well is the existing approval process
serving the needs of New Hampshire.
9:30
Matt Magnusson
Economic Impact of the Proposed Antrim 30 MW Wind Power Project in
Antrim, New Hampshire
Matt Magnusson is a graduate of the University of New
Hampshire’s (UNH) Whittemore School of Business and
Economics with a master of business administration. He
currently is earning his PhD in natural resources and
environmental studies at UNH and is also an adjunct
lecturer at UNH, teaching sustainability business models.
He has provided analysis on the economic impacts of
several different environmental public policy initiatives,
including work on the NH Renewable Portfolio Standard
(RPS) and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI),
a carbon cap-and-trade program in the Northeast.
Other research includes “New Hampshire’s Green
Economy and Industries: Current Employment and Future
Opportunities,” “Economic Impact of the Proposed Antrim
30 MW Wind Power Project in Antrim, New Hampshire,” and the economic analysis
of policies proposed in “The New Hampshire Climate Action Plan,” performed for the
NH Climate Change Task Force.
10:00
Factors, Guidelines, and Processes for Reviewing the Impact of Wind Farms
on Wildlife
Glenn Normandeau
Executive Director New Hampshire Fish and Game
Normandeau is serving his second four-year term as
Executive Director. Before becoming Fish and Game’s
Executive Director, Normandeau had served for more
than five years as the Fish and Game Commissioner
representing New Hampshire’s seacoast region. He is an
avid angler and hunter. He is also an experienced
businessman, with 19 years previous experience as
president and owner of Pickering Marine Corporation, a
specialist in marine contracting. He also served 5 years as
the marine industry representative on the New Hampshire
Department of Environmental Services Wetlands Council.
N.H. Fish and Game works in partnership with the public to conserve, manage and
protect the state’s fish, wildlife and marine resources and their habitats; inform and
educate the public about these resources; and provide the public with opportunities
to use and appreciate them.
Carol Foss, Ph.D.
NH Audubon Director of Conservation
Carol holds a B.A. in Biology from Colby College, a M.S. in Zoology
from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology
from the University of Maine. Carol has served NH Audubon in a
variety of capacities for more than 30 years, beginning her career
as resident naturalist at the Paradise Point Nature Center during
the summers of 1975 and 1976. She joined the headquarters staff
as part­time Education Director in 1977, and soon shifted to
Director of Wildlife Programs when NH Audubon partnered with
the NH Fish & Game Department to develop the NH Endangered
Species Program. After a serving as a consulting biologist while
working towards her Ph.D. and addressing family eldercare
needs, Carol returned to full­time duty as Director of Conservation
in September 2007. Carol is a New Hampshire native, and lives with her husband in the
Penacook neighborhood where her ancestors settled in the 1700s. She is especially interested
in bird behavior during the breeding cycle and in the influence of human activities on how birds
use the landscape. Her favorite places to do field work are the Androscoggin/Magalloway
watershed in northern New Hampshire and western Maine, and the Rio Tahuayo area in
northeastern Peru.
11:00
Fort Felker
Director, National Wind Technology Center
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
B.S., Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Prior to becoming director of the NWTC in 2009, Fort Felker was
the co-founder and vice president of Winglet Technology LLC, a
company that commercialized his patented design of “elliptical
winglets” for business aircraft. Elliptical winglets reduce drag
and fuel consumption, improving the range and takeoff
performance of aircraft. Before his six year stint as an
entrepreneur, Felker was an engineering analyst at Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory, where he developed the
underlying theory and computational modeling for the hypersonic
flow about re-entry vehicles undergoing extreme maneuvers.
From 1994-1996, Felker worked in senior engineering positions
at Kenetech Windpower. As manager of engineering modeling,
he was responsible for developing wind turbine engineering
analysis tools. Later as director of engineering analysis and test,
he played a key role in the development of the KVS-45 wind turbine, and led a team of
engineers and technicians in the testing of large wind turbine systems. His early experience
includes nine years with NASA Ames Research Center and six years with the U.S. Army
Research and Technology Labs, working on rotorcraft analysis and testing.
Felker holds one patent and is the author of 29 publications.
12:00
Lunch Break – Session Overflow Time
1:00
A Visual Impact Assessment Process for Wind Energy Projects
Jean Vissering
Jean Vissering Landscape Architecture – Montpeiler
Vermont
A Few of Her Recent Publications
Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects,
National Research Council of the National Academies
Sabin’s Pasture: A Vision for Development and
Conservation, Central Vermont Community Land Trust
Siting a Wind Turbine on Your Property: Putting Two Good Things Together, Small
Wind Technology & Vermont’s Scenic Landscape, Public Service Board
Wind Energy and Vermont’s Scenic Landscape: A Discussion Based on the
Woodbury Stakeholder Workshops, Vermont Public Service Department
Scenic Resource Evaluation Process, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources
Guidelines to be used by the Agency of Natural Resources in reviewing visual
impacts of development projects under Act 250 in areas of regional and statewide
scenic significance.
1:45
Wind Turbine Health Impact Study: Report of Independent Expert Panel
Sheryl Grace, Ph.D.
Boston University Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
Research Interests: Aerodynamics, Fluid dynamics, and
Acoustics
Professor Grace’s interests lie in the fields of unsteady
aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. She focuses on
creating analytical and computational models of the
mechanics which create sound and vibration. She is most
interested in applications in which the vibration and sound
result from the interactions of unsteady flows past solid
bodies, such as for aircraft external structures and marine
and aircraft propulsion systems. Her analyses are
intended to be used as predictive tools in the design of
next generation systems, and they offer a less expensive mode of prediction as
compared to experiment.
Three examples of physical applications her research group has considered in the
past are the noise generated by high-lift wing systems, the effect of vane clocking
in turbines, and the vibration and sound generated when flow passes over wall
apertures and cavities. The first is of great interest to commercial airline design, the
second impacts blade fatigue in aircraft engines, and the third has a wide variety of
applications ranging from the design of high speed trains to new configurations for
better cooling in computer chips.
Wendy Heiger-Bernays Ph.D.
Boston University – Associate Professor Environmental Health
Ph.D. University of Nebraska
Wendy Heiger-Bernays’ work reflects her education in molecular
toxicology and her professional experience in regulatory
toxicology and risk assessment. Her interests center on
understanding how environmental toxicants adversely affect
people’s health and how risks associated with these exposures
can be quantified. She is collaborating with researchers at
Wellesley College and UMASS Amherst to understand patterns of
migration of contaminants in compost in community gardens and
risks associated with these agents, with the objective of
translating this research into cost-effective best-practices. As a
member of a multi-disciplinary team she is investigating the
properties that impact human health and that limit the
installation of on-shore large wind-turbines. Dr. Heiger-Bernays
is a member of the BUSPH team investigating flame retardants in
which she is focusing on understanding the risks associated with
exposure to the chemicals. In the classroom, Dr. Heiger-Bernays combines the scientific
perspective with a practical emphasis. Her teaching focuses on providing graduate students
the core concepts required of environmental health professionals. She serves on technical
advisory committees for toxicological issues at both the Massachusetts Department of
Environmental Protection and the US Environmental Protection Agency and as chair of her
local board of health.
2:30
ISO New England’s Perspectives on the Impact of Wind Energy for the Grid
Mike Giaimo
External/Legislative Affairs for ISO New England
4:00
Observations on Wind Energy Approval Process in New Hampshire:
A Panel of Attorneys that Have Participated in the Process
Doug Patch
Doug spends much of his time on energy matters,
primarily in regulatory, administrative and legislative
venues. He also works on telecommunications issues and
serves as an arbitrator and mediator as part of his
alternative dispute resolution practice.
In addition to the ten years he has in private practice
representing a variety of clients, he brings twenty-three
years of public service experience to his practice, including
a nine and one-half year term as Chairman of the New
Hampshire Public Utilities Commission, three and one-half
years as an assistant attorney general, and six years as Assistant Commissioner
for the Department of Safety. As counsel for clients before administrative agencies,
Doug has helped obtain regulatory approvals for electric generation facilities,
including wind farms and other generating facilities. He has also represented clients
seeking approval for mergers, acquisitions and transfers of ownership, and has
conducted due diligence reviews for potential purchasers. He has represented
utilities and has intervened in utility proceedings for various companies,
organizations and ratepayer groups. Through his alternative dispute resolution
practice he has mediated and arbitrated issues related to the electric,
telecommunications and water industries, as well as environmental matters. He
has an active practice representing clients before the New Hampshire Legislature.
Amy Ignatius
Chairman New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission
University of Wisconsin (BA, American History, 1977)
University of Virginia (JD, 1982).
Prior experience:
NH Department of Justice, General Counsel, NH PUC
Executive Director, New England Conference of Public
Utilities Commissioners, Inc.
Director, NH Office of Energy and Planning
Commissioner, NH PUC
Vice Chairman, NH Site Evaluation Committee
Member, NH Nuclear Decommissioning Finance Committee
NARUC Committee on Telecommunications
Interstate TRS Fund Advisory Council
Amy Manzelli
Ms. Manzelli is a member and part owner of BCM
Environmental & Land Law, PLLC in Concord, NH. She
practices environmental, conservation, and land law
across New Hampshire.
Ms. Manzelli:

Guides green developers through projects, especially permitting of innovative
and low-impact techniques;

Assists those who oppose or wish to obtain modifications to projects of
others;

Represents clients regularly before all Courts in NH;

Advocates for clients at the State House, with officials of Executive Agencies,
and in Local Land Use Boards; and

Encourages passage, modification or defeat of relevant proposed laws.
Clients benefit from Ms. Manzelli’s commitment to the environment combined with
her extensive legal experience. SuperLawyers continues to rate her as a Rising Star
in Environmental Law. She is also:

On the Board of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New
Hampshire;

Representing the environment on the Residential Ratepayers Advisory Board
as an appointee of the New Hampshire Senate President; and

Serving as an appointee of Governor Lynch on the Water Sustainability
Commission.
Previously, Ms. Manzelli served for over two years on the legislative (HB1295)
Stormwater Commission, representing the New Hampshire Business and Industry
Association, which honored her with an Above and Beyond Award for her service.
Ms. Manzelli earned her Master’s in Environmental Law and her Juris Doctor degrees
from Vermont Law School; and her B.S. in Environmental Conservation and her
B.A. in Spanish from the University of New Hampshire, where she is now a
Distinguished Alumna.
Ms. Manzelli makes her home in Pembroke, NH, along with her husband, toddler,
and two rescued boxer dogs. She enjoys family time, local food, gardening, edible
landscapes, hiking, biking, cooking, and travel.
Peter Roth
Senior Assistant Attorney
Department of Justice Office of the Attorney General

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